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Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Eighth Annual Terrorism Conference: Al-Qaeda and Its Heirs


The Jamestown Foundation
 
Presents
 
 
Eighth Annual Terrorism Conference
Al-Qaeda and Its Heirs

 


Tuesday, December 9, 2014
8:30 A.M.–4:00 P.M.

The University Club of Washington, D.C.
Grand Ballroom (2nd Floor)
1135 Sixteenth Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20036


*To register for the conference please click here.
 
            

When discussing the conference on Twitter, please use the hashtag #JTFTerrorism.

Agenda
 
Registration
 8:00 A.M.–8:30 A.M.
 
*     *     * 
 
Welcome
 8:30 A.M.–8:40 A.M.
 
Glen E. Howard
President, The Jamestown Foundation
 
*    *     *

Panel One:
The Rise of Islamic State: Implications for the United States
8:40 A.M.–10:00 A.M.
 
Bruce Hoffman
Director, Center for Security Studies,
Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University &
Board Member, The Jamestown Foundation
 
Bruce Riedel
Senior Fellow, The Saban Center for Middle East Policy, Brookings Institution &
Former Board Member, The Jamestown Foundation  
 
Q & A
 
*     *     *
 
Coffee Break
10:00 A.M.–10:30 A.M.
 
*     *     *
 
Panel Two:
The Impact of Islamic State on Regional Security in Syria and Iraq
10:30 A.M.–12:00 P.M.
 
“Understanding Islamic State: What Victory Means in Its Grand Strategy”
Michael W.S. Ryan
Senior Fellow, The Jamestown Foundation
 
"Swimming in a Turbulent Sea? Non-State Threats to Islamic State”
Nicholas A. Heras
Middle East Analyst, Center for a New American Strategy (CNAS)
 
“The Political Economy of Islamic State and Its Financial Resources for War”
Murad Batal al-Shishani
Correspondent, BBC &
Analyst, The Jamestown Foundation
 
“Islamic State’s Threat to the Kurds in Syria and Northern Iraq”
Wladimir van Wilgenburg
Middle East Analyst, al-Monitor &
Analyst, The Jamestown Foundation
 
Q & A
 
*     *     *
 
Luncheon
12:00 P.M.–1:00 P.M.
 
*     *     *
 
Panel Three:
Trends and Strategies in Militant Groups in Egypt and Northwest Africa
1:00 P.M.–2:45 P.M.
 
“The Need for a Comprehensive Counter-Terrorism Strategy in Combatting Regional Jihadism: The View from Cairo”
Adel El-Adawy
Ph.D. Candidate, War Studies Department, King’s College London
 
“Libya’s Descent into Chaos: Warring Clans and Its Impact on Regional Stability”
Dario Cristiani
Adjunct Professor in International Affairs, Vesalius College &
Senior Analyst, Global Governance Institute in Brussels
 
“Boko Haram, Islamic State and the Archipelago Strategy in Northwest Africa”
Jacob Zenn
African and Eurasian Affairs Analyst, The Jamestown Foundation
 
Q & A
 
*     *     *
 
Coffee Break
2:45 P.M.–3:00 P.M.
 
*     *     *
 
Concluding Remarks
3:00 P.M.–4:00 P.M.
 
General Michael V. Hayden
Former Director of the Central Intelligence Agency &
Board Member, The Jamestown Foundation
 
Q & A
 
*     *     *
 
Conclusion
4:00 P.M.

Participant Biographies
 
 
Adel El-Adawy
 
Adel El-Adawy is a Ph.D. Candidate at the War Studies Department, King’s College London. His dissertation focuses on the impact of transnational security threats on patterns of civil-military relations in post-Mubarak Egypt. His research and publications have looked at security issues across the Middle East, and U.S.-Egyptian relations. Previously, he has held positions at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, American Security Project, Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), and the Middle East Institute. He holds a B.A. from the College of Wooster and an M.A. in political science from American University in Washington. He is fluent in Arabic, German and speaks basic Swedish.
 
 
Dario Cristiani
  
Dario Cristiani deals with Mediterranean and Middle Eastern security and history, with a specific focus on terrorism and sub-state groups, and is a frequent contributor to Jamestown’s publications Eurasia Daily MonitorTerrorism Monitor and Militant Leadership Monitor. He is adjunct professor in International Affairs at the Vesalius College in Brussels and senior analyst at the Global Governance Institute in Brussels. He is also a political risk consultant, working with a number of consultancies and organizations in Europe and the United States. 
 
 
Gen. Michael V.  Hayden (ret.)
 
General Michael V. Hayden (USAF Ret.) served as Director of the Central Intelligence Agency from 2006 to 2009 and was responsible for overseeing the collection of information concerning the plans, intentions and capabilities of America’s adversaries, producing timely analysis for decision makers and conducting covert operations to thwart terrorists and other enemies of the United States. Before becoming Director of the CIA, General Hayden served as the country’s first Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence—and was the highest-ranking intelligence officer in the armed forces. Earlier, he served as Commander of the Air Intelligence Agency, Director of the Joint Command and Control Warfare Center, Director of the National Security Agency from 1999 to 2005 and Chief of the Central Security Service. General Hayden graduated from Duquesne University with a bachelor’s degree in history in 1967 and a master’s degree in modern American history in 1969. He was a distinguished graduate of the university’s ROTC program and began his active military service in 1969. General Hayden is currently a principal at the Chertoff Group in Washington, D.C., and a Board Member at The Jamestown Foundation.
 
 
Nicholas A. Heras
 
Nicholas A. Heras is a Research Associate in the Middle East Security Program at the Center for a New American Security (CNAS). From 2013 to 2014, he served as a Research Associate at the National Defense University (NDU) where he worked on a project that studied the impact of the Syrian conflict on the greater Middle East region. He has over two years in-depth field research experience in all regions of Lebanon, Syria and Jordan and has also conducted substantive research in Turkey.
 
He has presented on the topic of armed groups in the Syrian civil war, including the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), at the annual U.S. Naval War College, Center for Irregular Warfare and Armed Groups (USNWC-CIWAG) Symposium; he also presented a lecture on ISIL’s state formation strategy to the U.S. SOCOM J3I. As a regular contributor to The Jamestown Foundation’s Militant Leadership Monitor and Terrorism Monitor, Mr. Heras is a prolific author of analytical works focusing on security issues in the greater Middle East region. He has also authored a monograph, Policy Focus #132, The Potential for an Assad Statelet in Syria, through the Washington Institute for Near East Policy (WINEP)’s Soref Fellowship program.
 
 
Bruce Hoffman
 
Professor Bruce Hoffman is a Board Member of The Jamestown Foundation. He has been studying terrorism and insurgency for more than thirty years. Professor Hoffman is currently a tenured professor at Georgetown University’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service where he is also the Director of both the Center for Security Studies and the Security Studies Program. Professor Hoffman previously held the Corporate Chair in Counterterrorism and Counterinsurgency at the RAND Corporation and was also Director of RAND’s Washington, D.C., Office.
 
Professor Hoffman was Scholar-in-Residence for Counter-terrorism at the Central Intelligence Agency between 2004 and 2006.  He was also an advisor on counter-terrorism to the Office of National Security Affairs, Coalition Provisional Authority, Baghdad, Iraq, during the spring of 2004 and from 2004 to 2005 was an adviser on counter-insurgency to the Strategy, Plans and Analysis Office at Multi-National Forces-Iraq Headquarters, Baghdad. Professor Hoffman was also an adviser to the Iraq Study Group.
 
 
Bruce Riedel
 
Bruce Riedel is a Senior Fellow in the Saban Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution. He retired in 2006 after 30 years of service at the Central Intelligence Agency including postings overseas. Riedel was a senior advisor on South Asia and the Middle East to four Presidents of the United States in the staff of the National Security Council at the White House. He was a negotiator at several Arab-Israeli peace summits, including at Camp David and Wye River. He was also Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for the Near East and South Asia at the Pentagon and a senior advisor at NATO in Brussels. In January 2009, President Barack Obama asked Mr. Riedel to chair a review of American policy toward Afghanistan and Pakistan, the results of which the President announced in a speech on March 27, 2009. In 2011, he served as an expert advisor to the prosecution of al-Qaeda terrorist Omar Farooq Abdulmutallab in Detroit. In December 2011, Prime Minister David Cameron asked him to brief the United Kingdom’s National Security Council in London on Pakistan.
 
Mr. Riedel is the author of The Search for al Qaeda: Its Leadership, Ideology and Future and Deadly Embrace: Pakistan, America and the Future of the Global Jihad.  He is a contributor to Which Path to Persia: Options for a New American Strategy Toward Iran, The Arab Awakening and Becoming Enemies: U.S.-Iran Relations and the Iran-Iraq War, 1979–1988.  He teaches at the Johns Hopkins University School for Advanced International Studies. He is a graduate of Brown (B.A.), Harvard (M.A.) and the Royal College of Defense Studies in London.
 
 
Michael W. S. Ryan
 
Dr. Michael W.S. Ryan is a Senior Fellow at The Jamestown Foundation and an adjunct scholar at the Middle East Institute. He is the author of the  book, Decoding al-Qaeda’s Strategy: The Deep Battle Against America, published by Columbia University Press. The book examines al-Qaeda’s political military strategy based upon Arabic-language sources. Dr. Ryan is also president of a firm based in Arlington, Virginia, specializing in research and analysis on Middle Eastern security issues. 
 
Dr. Ryan served as Senior Vice President at The Middle East Institute in Washington, D.C. (2008–2009). The White House appointed him as Vice President in The Millennium Challenge Corporation (2006–2008). Previously, Dr. Ryan held senior positions in the Departments of State, Defense and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency after joining the U.S. federal government in 1979 as a Middle East/North Africa analyst for the Department of Defense. 
 
In 1981, Dr. Ryan earned a Ph.D. from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University. During his graduate study, he spent three years in Egypt under Fulbright, Smithsonian and Center for Arabic Study Abroad fellowships. He was also a fellow at The American Research Center in Egypt during this period. He received his undergraduate degree from St. John’s College in Annapolis, Maryland.
 
 
Murad Batal al-Shishani
 
Murad Batal al-Shishani is a correspondent for the BBC and an in-house expert on militant groups. For the past decade, he has been a frequent contributor to the Jamestown Foundation publication Terorrism Monitor. An analyst based in London, he is a well known expert on Islamic groups and terrorism issues. Mr. al-Shishani is a specialist on Islamic movements in Chechnya and Islamic militant movements in the Middle East. He has written for several prestigious publications, including Jamestown Foundation’s Terrorism Monitor, BBC News Online, Le Monde Diplomatique, OpenDemocracy and many others. He has contributed to academic books and he is author of three books; Al-Qaeda: Geopolitical, Strategic Outlook and Social Composition (ECSSR-Abu Dhabi, 2012), The Islamic Movement in Chechnya and the Chechen-Russian Conflict 1990–2000 (Amman, 2001), and Iraqi Resistance: National Liberation vs. Terrorism: A Quantitative Study (Iraqi Studies Series, Issue 5, Gulf Research Center–Dubai, November 2005).  
 
 
Wladimir van Wilgenburg
 
Wladimir van Wilgenburg is a political analyst based in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq who specializes in Kurdish politics. He has written extensively for The Jamestown Foundation’s publications and other journals such as the Near East Quarterly and the World Affairs Journal. In addition to Jamestown, he currently writes for al-Monitor and was the co-author of the Henri Jackson Society report “Unity or PYD Power Play? Syrian Kurdish Dynamics after the Erbil Agreement.” Mr. van Wilgenburg provides commentary and advice to a variety of media outlets, NGOs and think tanks. In 2011, Mr. Van Wilgenburg received an M.A. from the University of Utrecht’s Conflict Studies program, writing his thesis on Kirkuk’s Arab political spectrum, based on first-hand research in Iraq. He will graduate from the University of Exeter’s Kurdish Studies MPhil program in January.
 
 
Jacob Zenn 
 
Jacob Zenn is an expert on Boko Haram and a consultant on countering violent extremism for U.S think-tanks and international organizations in Nigeria and Central Asia. He is the author of “Northern Nigeria's Boko Haram: The Prize in al-Qaeda’s Africa Strategy,” published by The Jamestown Foundation in 2012 and based on his fieldwork in Boko Haram’s main area of operations in northern Nigeria, northern Cameroon, Chad and southern Niger. Mr. Zenn also writes reports on Nigerian security for The Jamestown Foundation Terrorism Monitor and West Point Combating Terrorism Center.
 
In February and November 2013, Mr. Zenn provided testimony on Islamist Militant Threats to Central Asia and the Threat of Boko Haram and Ansaru in Nigeria to the U.S. Congress. Mr. Zenn speaks Arabic, Swahili, Chinese, French and Spanish in addition to his native English. He holds a J.D. from Georgetown Law, where he earned the commendation of Global Law Scholar.


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Is Iran About to Blow It?

Is Iran About to Blow It?

10/21/14
John Allen Gay
Nuclear Proliferation, Iran

Tehran has won the PR battle in the nuclear talks, argues a new report, but that won't lead to negotiating-table victories.

Iran’s negotiators have successfully framed these final days of the nuclear talks on their terms—and that might lull them into making big mistakes. That’s Brookings Iran watcher Suzanne Maloney’s argument in a deep analysis of Iranian tactics ahead of the November 24 expiration of the interim agreement. Tehran, she says, is taking four steps to strengthen its hand.
First, it’s using “the divisions within its ruling system” to play “an elaborate game of good-cop-bad-cop.” Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei’s regular pronouncements about what the final deal must allow foster a perception that he is reining in his negotiators and insisting on a tougher position, particularly on Iran’s enrichment capacity; the negotiators can then go to their counterparts and claim their hands are tied. However, Maloney writes, “there is no hard evidence that absent the Supreme Leader's public rhetoric, Iran's position on enrichment was particularly flexible.” Rouhani and Zarif, she says, have both made statements of their own about preserving enrichment capacity and mitigating international worries with measures in other areas.
Second, Iran is promoting itself as a bulwark against the marauding Islamic State, one whose “assistance...can be bought” at the nuclear negotiating table. This, Maloney suggests, may explain the increased visibility of powerful IRGC Qods Force commander Ghassem Soleimani on the frontlines in Iraq—appearing in “battlefield selfies,” to use her term. Is Iran showing off its wares?
Third, Iran has sought to “depict [its] rehabilitation as a fait accompli,” with the nuclear deal a minor obstacle standing in the way of an Islamic Republican triumph. “Rouhani and company have sought to persuade the world that the era of Iranian isolation has now passed,” writes Maloney, “...and that business as usual can resume immediately.” In this vein, there have been waves of exploratory talks between Iranian and European commercial interests.
Read full articlehttp://nationalinterest.org/feature/iran-about-blow-it-11502

A Revival of Sanctions: How to Get Iran to Compromise on a Nuclear Deal

A Revival of Sanctions: How to Get Iran to Compromise on a Nuclear Deal

10/21/14
Emanuele Ottolenghi, Saeed Ghasseminejad
Nonproliferation, Diplomacy, Nuclear Weapons, Iran, United States, Europe

The sanctions relief provided by the Obama administration has helped the Iranian economy to the point where Iran doesn't see a need to make concessions on a nuclear deal. Time to increase pressure on Tehran.

When the Obama administration signed the nuclear interim agreement with Iran last November, it insisted that the scope of sanctions relief was limited, its impact modest and the duration of the interim deal so short that whatever benefits Iran may reap were fully reversible.
The administration remains adamant that its predictions were accurate, but in fact, Iran’s current economic data show something altogether different and more troubling. Iran’s economy, on the eve of the interim agreement, was on the verge of collapse. Today, weeks away from the deadline for a final deal, it is on course for recovery. Limited sanctions relief prematurely squandered much of the leverage the Obama administration and its European partners had with Iran. Ten months of sanctions relief failed to deliver a deal and only delivered Iran from economic collapse. Western leverage, already diminished before major Iranian concessions are obtained, will continue to shrink over time, if further extensions are required to reach what has so far proved to be an elusive deal.
According to the Central Bank of Iran, during the first quarter of Iran’s calendar year (Spring 2014), Iran experienced a 4.6 percent growth rate, as compared to the previous year. Even more impressively, this growth touched all sectors of Iran’s economy.
According to Iran’s Ministry of Industries and Business, Iran has manufactured 71 percent more cars in the first four months of Iran’s current calendar year (April to July 2014) compared to the same period last year, a direct result of sanctions suspension against Iran’s automotive sector. According to Masoud Soltanifar, the Chairman of Iran’s Tourism Organization, Iran has enjoyed a 200 percent increase in the number of foreign tourists compared to 2013.
Read full articlehttp://nationalinterest.org/feature/revival-sanctions-how-get-iran-compromise-nuclear-deal-11504

Putin's Power Play: Why Russia Holds Most of the Cards in the Ukraine Crisis


Putin's Power Play: Why Russia Holds Most of the Cards in the Ukraine Crisis

10/21/14
James W. Carden
Security, Foreign Policy, Energy, Ukraine, Europe, Russia, United States

And why the situation might go from bad to worse. 

Reports out of Milan regarding last Friday’s much anticipated meeting between Russian president Vladimir Putin and Ukrainian president Petro Poroshenko indicate that little progress has been made toward resolving the nearly yearlong Ukraine crisis. This, given the broader political currents at play in Europe, is unsurprising.
To begin with, Mr. Poroshenko has, for all intents and purposes, lost the military battle over the Donbas in resounding fashion. While his bloc leads in the polls ahead of next Sunday’s parliamentary election, Poroshenko faces a number of other challenges, not least of which is a collapsing economy (some estimates have the Ukrainian economy shrinking by 10 percent this year) and a burgeoning populist backlash over the government’s handling of the crisis.
So what we saw play out in Milan is more or less a repeat of the last Putin/Poroshenko meeting that took place in Minsk on August 26, because the same logic applies. Mr. Putin, as I wrote then, is always going to be the party—regardless of whether he is facing sanctions or a chorus of international condemnation—who will be playing the stronger hand in negotiations with Ukraine. Yet as we approach November, his hand is even stronger, as the crisis begins to transform from a military confrontation between Russia and Ukraine into a confrontation between Ukraine and Europe over the supply of Russian natural gas. Ukraine serves as the transit point for 50 percent of EU-bound Russian LNG, and Ukraine’s siphoning off of LNG bound for southeastern Europe, which led to Russia cutting off the supply in January 2006 and January 2009, is still fresh in the minds of European leaders.
Read full articlehttp://nationalinterest.org/feature/putins-power-play-why-russia-holds-most-the-cards-the-11506

Nigeria Is Ebola-Free: Here’s What They Did Right

Nigeria Is Ebola-Free: Here’s What They Did Right


http://time.com/3522984/ebola-nigeria-who/

Liberia president says Ebola has brought country to 'a standstill'

Liberia president says Ebola has brought country to 'a standstill'


http://www.foxnews.com/world/2014/10/20/liberia-president-says-ebola-has-brought-country-to-standstill/

Liberia’s president appeals to world for help against Ebola

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/liberias-president-appeals-to-world-for-help-against-ebola/article21160803/

Liberia president describes heavy cost of Ebola

http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/world/2014/10/20/ebola-west-africa/17598505/

US Army Withheld Promise From Germany That Ebola Virus Wouldn’t be Weaponized

US Army Withheld Promise From Germany That Ebola Virus Wouldn’t be Weaponized


http://www.globalresearch.ca/us-army-withheld-promise-from-germany-that-ebola-virus-wouldnt-be-weaponized/5409004

Are Americans Overreacting To The Ebola Virus?

Are Americans Overreacting To The Ebola Virus?


http://www.forbes.com/sites/yanzhonghuang/2014/10/21/are-americans-overreacting-to-the-ebola-virus/

How Ebola's 300+ Mutations Could Make The Virus Even Scarier

How Ebola's 300+ Mutations Could Make The Virus Even Scarier


http://www.businessinsider.com/ebola-mutations-change-virus-2014-10

Ebola Study Projects Spread of Virus on Overseas Flights

Ebola Study Projects Spread of Virus on Overseas Flights

Up to 3 Infected People Could Fly Overseas Every Month From Most-Affected African Nations


http://online.wsj.com/articles/ebola-study-projects-spread-of-virus-on-overseas-flights-1413846023?tesla=y&cb=logged0.34084938555325495

Dealing with the next financial meltdown

Dealing with the next financial meltdown

http://www.businesstimes.com.sg/opinion/dealing-with-the-next-financial-meltdown 

The Similarities Between Germany and China

The Similarities Between Germany and China


By George Friedman

I returned last weekend from a month-long trip to both East Asia and Europe. I discovered three things: First, the Europeans were obsessed with Germany and concerned about Russia. Second, the Asians were obsessed with China and concerned about Japan. Third, visiting seven countries from the Pacific to the Atlantic in 29 days brings you to a unique state of consciousness, in which the only color is gray and knowing the number of your hotel room in your current city, as opposed to the one two cities ago, is an achievement.
 

The world is not getting smaller. There is no direct flight from the United States to Singapore, and it took me 27 hours of elapsed travel to get there. There is a direct flight from Munich to Seoul, but since I started in Paris, that trip also took about 17 hours. Given how long Magellan took to circumnavigate the world, and the fact that he was killed in the Philippines, I have no basis for complaint. But the fact is that the speed of global travel has plateaued, as has the global economic system. There is a general sense of danger in Europe and Asia. There is no common understanding on what that danger is.

I was in Seoul last week when the news of a possible wave of European crises began to spread, and indications emerged that Germany might be shifting its view on austerity. It was striking how little this seemed to concern senior officials and business leaders. I was in the Czech Republic when the demonstrations broke out in Hong Kong. The Czechs saw this as a distant event on which they had opinions but which was unlikely to affect them regardless of the outcome.

Read more »http://www.stratfor.com/weekly/similarities-between-germany-and-china#axzz3GhLFXSka

Israelis excel at camouflaging the expulsion of Palestinians

http://www.haaretz.com/news/diplomacy-defense/.premium-1.621596

Israelis excel at camouflaging the expulsion of Palestinians

Here is an inventory of the methods of expulsion in their various concealments.

By  Oct. 20, 2014 | 4:01 PM |  10



submit to reddit
As the descendants of a people which was banished throughout history from its homes and various homelands, we Israelis have developed our own expulsion skills – skills that would not embarrass the kings, nobles and officials of the goyim. Our contribution to the family of banishing nations is great, especially considering our short existence as a sovereign entity.
After the big expulsion of between 700,000 and 800,000 Palestinians in 1948, we have made do with smaller expulsions, and excel in camouflaging them under various legal definitions or varying circumstantial theories. The Israeli civil-military bureaucracy does not attempt to bathe its acts in any single guiding ideology. But the spirit of Avigdor Lieberman, Naftali Bennett, Rehavam Ze’evi and Yosef Weitz is watching from above.
Here is an inventory of the methods of expulsion in their various concealments:

Public Worry Over Remote Threats

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ivan-eland/public-worry-over-remote_b_6021700.html

Senior Fellow and Director of the Center on Peace & Liberty, The Independent Institute

Public Worry Over Remote Threats

Posted: 10/21/2014
The breathless news coverage of the minuscule number of people in the United States that have so far contracted the Ebola virus has led to a typical irrational response in some quarters. For example, schools have been closed, and the public and thus some politicians support a travel ban of people from the affected West African countries, even though health professionals have said that this "solution" might make things worse. Despite such professionals repeating often that Ebola is inefficiently transmitted, that West Africa has a much lower level of general health care than does the United States, and that therefore the American problem is likely to be only contagion among the health workers tending to the very small number of victims rather than in the general population, many people are still nervous that they or their family will catch the virus.

The Rise And Fall Of The iPad

The Rise And Fall Of The iPad


http://www.businessinsider.com/the-rise-and-fall-of-the-ipad-2014-10?nr_email_referer=1&utm_source=Triggermail&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Tech%20Chart%20Of%20The%20Day&utm_campaign=SAI_COTD_102114

Washington Should Stop Squandering "Defense" Dollars On Rich Allies And Failed States

Washington Should Stop Squandering "Defense" Dollars On Rich Allies And Failed States



http://www.forbes.com/sites/dougbandow/2014/10/20/republican-party-hawks-demand-more-military-spending-than-during-the-cold-war-washington-should-stop-squandering-defense-dollars-to-protect-other-nations/

How Edward Snowden Changed Journalism

How Edward Snowden Changed Journalism

by Steve Coll
 

Out Loud: Outsmarting Ebola

Out Loud: Outsmarting Ebola


 

Beating Ebola through a national plan

Beating Ebola through a national plan



http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/beating-ebola-through-a-national-plan/2014/10/20/020f13b6-586e-11e4-8264-deed989ae9a2_story.html

CFR Update 10/21 CDC Announces New Ebola Guidelines

If you are unable to see the message below, click here to view.
Council on Foreign Relations Daily News Brief
October 21, 2014

Top of the Agenda

CDC Announces New Ebola Guidelines
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced new guidelines (Al Jazeera) for treating Ebola on Monday night. The regulations call for a site manager to supervise healthcare workers when putting on and removing protective gear. Healthcare workers are also required to wear head-to-toe gear (Reuters) with no skin exposure, undergo special training, and show competency in using protective equipment. U.S. emergency doctors say that with proper protocols in place, there is no need to panic over the spread of Ebola.

Analysis

"We cannot be a country ruled by fear. We must care for those in need. But a few hospitals cannot combat this public health threat alone. We need government leadership to provide the resources necessary to implement a coordinated, scalable national plan. It can be done," writes John T. Fox in the Washington Post.
"The fear and panic could place further constraints on government capacity to tackle the public health emergency. Worse, the associated social distancing measures, in conjunction with the government anti-Ebola interventions, could have substantial negative economic impacts in the United States. […] Americans may be overreacting to the threat of Ebola, but that overreaction is understandable. When planning further Ebola control measures, the Obama administration has to seriously take this fear factor into account," writes CFR's Yanzhong Huang.
"[Ebola] is a frightening disease. […] But Americans need to relax. We need to be realistic. The real problem is not one, two cases here in the United States. The real problem is that this epidemic is completely out of control in Africa," said CFR's Laurie Garrett on NBC's Meet the Press.

Global Health Now Update 10/21 Re: Ebola