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Friday, April 24, 2015

Dangerous Gamesmanship By Steve Coll

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/04/27/dangerous-gamesmanship

THE NEW YORKER  April 27, 2015 Issue

Dangerous Gamesmanship

By

During the early nineteen-thirties, Bolivia and Paraguay fought a war over an arid borderland called Chaco Boreal. Congress passed a resolution permitting President Franklin Roosevelt to impose an embargo on arms shipments to both countries, and he did. Prosecutors later charged the Curtiss-Wright Export Corporation with running guns to Bolivia. The company challenged the resolution, but, in 1936, the Supreme Court issued a thumping endorsement of a President’s prerogative to lead foreign policy. “In this vast external realm, with its important, complicated, delicate and manifold problems,” the majority wrote, only the President “has the power to speak or listen as a representative of the nation. . . . He alone negotiates.” In this respect, the Justices added, Congress is “powerless.”

Why the US must think differently about China's new development bank



Why the US must think differently about China's new development bank



http://www.businessinsider.com/why-the-us-must-think-differently-about-chinas-new-development-bank-2015-4?nr_email_referer=1&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Business%20Insider%20Select&utm_campaign=BI%20Select%20%28Wednesday%20Friday%29%202015-04-24&utm_content=BISelect

China’s Nuclear Warning

China’s Nuclear Warning

Twenty years after an Iran-style deal, North Korea has 20 bombs.


http://www.wsj.com/articles/chinas-nuclear-warning-1429831422

China warns: North Korea’s nuclear arsenal is expanding


http://www.rawstory.com/2015/04/china-warns-north-koreas-nuclear-arsenal-is-expanding/

A Harrowing Heads-Up From China: North Korea Ups Nuclear Capability


http://news.investors.com/ibd-editorials-viewpoint/042315-749398-a-harrowing-heads-up-from-china-north-korea-ups-nuclear-capability.htm

What happens when China becomes No. 1?



By Kishore Mahbubani
The Straits Times
Section: Opinion
24 April 2015
 
What happens when China becomes No. 1?
The answer may well depend on how America acts now, when it is still the world's sole superpower.

Let me begin with three incontrovertible facts. First, China will become the No. 1 economic power in the world.

Second, most Americans, like most Westerners, view China's rise with great foreboding.

Third, the role that China will play as the No. 1 economic power has not been cast in stone.

How the world, especially America, reacts to China's rise will help to influence China's behaviour in the future.

If we make the right decisions now, China could well emerge as a benign great power (even though most Americans find this virtually inconceivable).http://www.straitstimes.com/news/opinion/more-opinion-stories/story/what-happens-when-china-becomes-no-1-20150424

WPR Articles April 20, 2015 - April 24, 2015

Editor’s Note

How might a final deal between Iran and the West over Tehran’s nuclear program reshape the Middle East? In his feature this week, Trita Parsi explores the regional implications of a successful nuclear agreement and the potential for rapprochement between the United States and Iran. “Instead of partnership,” Parsi writes, “Tehran is offering Washington a truce.”

One country that could be affected by any regional realignment is Yemen, where women are fighting to protect the gains of the 2011 uprising, despite new turmoil from the Saudi-led military campaign against Houthi rebels. As Patricia Leidl and Valerie M. Hudson explain, “the promise of women’s rights lies shattered amid the rubble of Yemen’s failed peace process,” which was doomed to fail since it didn’t include more women.

And in our latest country report, Elisabete Azevedo-Harman and Belarmino Jelembi look at how rising inequality, falling oil prices and a looming succession crisis are testing Angola’s postwar stability.

Coming up on WPR: Ernest Harsch on activists in Burkina Faso pushing hard for a political reckoning, Jason Marczak on how Argentina can live up to its potential and, in our next feature, Sarah Chayes on corruption in Nigeria as both a governance problem and a moral challenge for society.

Frederick Deknatel, Associate Editor
 

WPR Articles April 20, 2015 - April 24, 2015

Assad’s Western Media Campaign Reveals His Weakness, Not Strength

By: Frederick Deknatel | Trend Lines
Syrian President Bashar al-Assad keeps presenting himself in interviews with Western media outlets as the necessary partner for any political solution to Syria’s civil war, but his regime is abandoning more territory and substituting barrel bombs for manpower. With the latest battlefield shifts, he looks weaker.

Despite Talk of Peace in Afghanistan, the Taliban Prepare to Fight

By: Michael Semple | Briefing
Amid reports of possible negotiations with the Taliban to end Afghanistan’s war, revived by Afghan President Ashraf Ghani, the Taliban leadership sent its fighters back into battle. Talk of negotiations ignores how far removed Qatar-based Taliban diplomats are from the reality of the fighters on the ground.

U.S. Seeks to Reassure Japan, South Korea on Asia Pivot

By: Richard Weitz | Briefing
Ashton Carter recently concluded his first visit to East Asia since becoming U.S. secretary of defense. His discussions in Japan and South Korea signaled that he has quickly become a pivotal player in the administration’s policy of “rebalancing” U.S. strategic priorities toward the region.

Indonesia’s Jokowi Vows Strict Policy, Death Penalty for Drug Crimes

By: The Editors | Trend Lines
Indonesia’s Supreme Court on Tuesday rejected the final appeals of two prisoners from France and Ghana currently on death row for drug smuggling. In an interview, Gloria Lai, a senior policy officer at the International Drug Policy Consortium, discussed Indonesia’s zero-tolerance approach to drugs.

Obama’s Islamic State Strategy Avoids Failure—but Also Success

By: Steven Metz | Column
When U.S. President Barack Obama announced his strategy for countering the so-called Islamic State last September, it was met with an immediate volley of criticism. Though much of this was fueled by partisanship, even when graded by its own objectives, the Obama strategy has had mixed results.

More

South Africa’s Zuma Faces Double Bind on Troubled Economy

By: James Hamill | Briefing
The past two years have been deeply unsettling ones for South Africa’s economy, which like other emerging markets around the world, including the once-solid BRICS, is in a sea of trouble. That stands in sharp contrast to the established view of South Africa as an African powerhouse and emerging market leader.

U.N. Serves as Perfect Alibi for Big Power Inaction in Unfixable Crises

By: Richard Gowan | Column
The U.N.’s peacemaking and peacekeeping apparatus has been stretched to the breaking point by the fallout from the Arab revolutions. But while the organization has struggled to resolve crises in Syria, Yemen, Mali and Libya, the U.N. was clearly being set up for potential failure in each case.

Suspending Money Transfers to Somalia Hurts the Poor, Not Terrorists

By: The Editors | Trend Lines
Earlier this month, Kenya suspended the licenses of 13 Somali money transfer agencies operating in Nairobi in a bid to limit funding to al-Shabab. In an interview, Sarah Hearn of New York University’s Center on International Cooperation discussed the role of remittances in Somalia’s economy.

Truce: Iran, the U.S. and the Middle East After the Nuclear Deal

By: Trita Parsi | Feature
The recent framework agreement between Iran and the P5+1 removed a major hurdle toward resolving the standoff over Tehran’s nuclear program. Could a final deal bring about a broader rapprochement between the U.S. and Iran? And how would it affect Iran’s regional policy in the Middle East?

Crises in Ukraine, Mediterranean Put NATO Solidarity to the Test

By: Nikolas Gvosdev | Column
Over the past year, NATO seemed to rediscover a common purpose after two decades of trying out for different roles: putting a brake on the westward spread of Russian influence. Trouble on the southern periphery, however, now competes with the urgency of addressing problems on the eastern front.

Hedging Their Bets, China, Japan and South Korea Push Trilateral Ties

By: J. Berkshire Miller | Briefing
Foreign ministers from China, Japan and South Korea gathered in Seoul last month to discuss ways to restore trilateral diplomacy. Despite bilateral strains, trilateralism should not be underestimated. It allows all parties to compartmentalize individual grievances and provides diplomatic camouflage for engagement.

In New Rivalry, Great Powers Come Calling on India and Pakistan

By: Frida Ghitis | Column
When Chinese President Xi Jinping arrived in Pakistan this week, the reception was something to behold, but it was hardly unique. South Asia is abuzz with high-stakes diplomatic activity. And the pace of diplomacy, along with the mountains of cash being discussed, shows no sign of diminishing.

India’s Ties With North Korea Cordial but Limited

By: The Editors | Trend Lines
Last week, North Korean Foreign Minister Ri Su Yong was in New Delhi for talks with Indian Foreign Minister Sushma Swaraj on North Korea’s nuclear program and to request additional humanitarian assistance. In an interview, Ankit Panda of The Diplomat discussed India’s ties with North Korea.

Russia Becomes the Middle East’s Preferred but Flawed Nuclear Partner

By: Chen Kane, Miles Pomper | Briefing
As Turkey breaks ground on its first, Russian-backed nuclear power plant, Russia is on the verge of becoming the nuclear Wal-Mart of the Middle East. Across the region, Russian nuclear exports come with many advantages but also raise concerns for the international community, including on oversight and regulation.

Yemen’s Women Fight to Protect Uprising’s Gains Amid New Turmoil

By: Patricia Leidl, Valerie M. Hudson | Briefing
For a few brief months in 2011, Yemen returned to a more equitable and less conservative past, with more space for women’s rights. But four years later, amid the Saudi-led campaign against the Houthis, that promise lies broken in the rubble of Yemen’s peace process, which failed to include more Yemeni women.
 

The Long Drone War by Steve Coll

The Long Drone War

by Steve Coll

Why Does No One Speak of America’s Oligarchs?

Why Does No One Speak of America’s Oligarchs?


http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2013/03/why-does-no-one-speak-of-americas-oligarchs.html

After 9/11, We Were All Judith Miller

After 9/11, We Were All Judith Miller

Journalists owe the American people an apology.


http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2015/04/what-journalists-got-wrong-after-911-117203.html#.VTpNeJPlxbI

Consent of the Governed: Stop the Emerging TPP Tyranny!

Consent of the Governed: Stop the Emerging TPP Tyranny!


http://www.correntewire.com/consent_of_the_governed_stop_the_emerging_tpp_tyranny

Using the dead: the ‘NYT’ works with Israel to justify military service

Using the dead: the ‘NYT’ works with Israel to justify military service

By Tzvia Thier
A New York Times article celebrating sacrifice in the Israeli army on the country's memorial day was deeply disturbing to Tzvia Thier, who has personally experienced such loss. These soldiers died in vain, for a government dispensing terror. Journalists should not be celebrating that sacrifice.
Read in browser »http://mondoweiss.net/2015/04/justify-military-service?utm_source=Mondoweiss+List&utm_campaign=1e02bb4006-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_b86bace129-1e02bb4006-398529985

The Week with IPS 4/24

   2015/4/24 Click here for the online version of this IPS newsletter   

Talk of Death Squads to Combat New Wave of Gang Violence in El Salvador
Edgardo Ayala
The resurgence of violent crime in El Salvador is giving rise to a hostile social environment in El Salvador reminiscent of the country’s 12-year civil war, which could compromise the country’s still unsteady democracy. After recent attacks by gangs against police and soldiers, there is talk in ... MORE > >

Two Years After Rana Plaza Tragedy, Rights Abuses Still Rampant in Bangladesh’s Garment Sector
Kanya D'Almeida and Naimul Haq
Some say they were beaten with iron bars. Others confess their families have been threatened with death. One pregnant woman was assaulted with metal curtain rods. These are not scenes typically associated with a place of work, but thousands of people employed in garment factories in Bangladesh ... MORE > >

Saudis Compensate Civilian Killings with 274 Million in Humanitarian Aid to Yemen
Thalif Deen
Saudi Arabia’s right hand does not know what its left foot is up to, belittles an Asian diplomat, mixing his metaphors to describe the political paradox in the ongoing military conflict in Yemen. The Saudis, who are leading a coalition of Arab states, have been accused of indiscriminate bombings ... MORE > >

The U.N. at 70: A View from Outer Space
Dr. Nandasiri Jasentuliyana
When the founding fathers of the United Nations met in San Francisco 70 years ago, an American banker named Beardsley Ruml made a remark: Courtesy of Dr. Nandasiri Jasentuliyana “At the end of five years, you will think the United Nations is the greatest vision ever realized by man. At the ... MORE > >

Tailings Ponds Pose a Threat to Chilean Communities
Marianela Jarroud
Chile lives under the constant threat of spillage from tailings ponds, which became even more marked in late March after heavy rains fell in the desert region of Atacama leaving over two dozen people dead and missing and thousands without a home. Copiapó, capital of the region of the same name, ... MORE > >

From Slavery to Self Reliance: A Story of Dalit Women in South India
Stella Paul
HuligeAmma, a Dalit woman in her mid-forties, bends over a sewing machine, carefully running the needle over the hem of a shirt. Sitting nearby is Roopa, her 22-year-old daughter, who reads an amusing message on her cell phone and laughs heartily. The pair leads a simple yet contented life – ... MORE > >

Giving African Artists Their Names
A. D. McKenzie
Quick now, can you name a famous African sculptor from the 1800s or even the early 20th century? Anyone able to answer positively is part of a select minority – most museum-goers have become used to seeing traditional African carvings without knowing the name of the artist. Artwork by ... MORE > >

Tribunal Ruling Could Dent “Monster Boat” Trawling in West African Waters
Saikou Jammeh
It was five in the afternoon and Buba Badjie, a boat captain, had just brought his catch to the shore. He had spent twelve hours at sea off Bakau, a major fish landing site in The Gambia. Inside the trays strewn on the floor bed of his wooden boat were bonga and catfish. Scores of women crowded ... MORE > >

Women Farmers Rewrite Their History in Chile's Patagonia Region
Marianela Jarroud
More than 100 women small farmers from Chile’s southern Patagonia region have joined together in a new association aimed at achieving economic autonomy and empowerment, in an area where machismo and gender inequality are the norm. Patricia Mancilla, Nancy Millar and Blanca Molina spoke with IPS ... MORE > >

Q&A: Iranian Balochistan is a “Hunting Ground” – Nasser Boladai
Karlos Zurutuza
Nasser Boladai is the spokesperson of the Congress of Nationalities for a Federal Iran (CNFI), an umbrella movement aimed at expanding support for a secular, democratic and federal Iran. IPS spoke with him in Geneva, where he was invited to speak at a recent conference on Human Rights and Global ... MORE > >

The King of the Arab Street vs. the Pope

The King of the Arab Street vs. the Pope

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is playing politics with the centennial of the Armenian genocide.

http://foreignpolicy.com/2015/04/22/the-king-of-the-arab-street-vs-the-pope/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Flashpoints&utm_campaign=BS%204%2F24%202014_FlashPoints%20[Manual]

Botched U.S. Strike Highlights Risks of Obama’s Drone War

Botched U.S. Strike Highlights Risks of Obama’s Drone War

Obama has taken personal responsibility for the strike that killed an American development expert and an Italian aid worker. But the apology raises more questions than it answers.


https://foreignpolicy.com/2015/04/23/botched_us_drone_strike-_kills_two_western-_hostages/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Flashpoints&utm_campaign=BS%204%2F24%202014_FlashPoints%20[Manual]

Europe Passes the Buck While Thousands Die

Europe Passes the Buck While Thousands Die

How EU cost-cutting, continental infighting, and bureaucratic indifference turned the Mediterranean into a graveyard.


https://foreignpolicy.com/2015/04/23/europes-gray-suits-give-refugees-a-cold-shoulder-shipwreck-migrants-mediterranean/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Flashpoints&utm_campaign=BS%204%2F24%202014_FlashPoints%20[Manual]

The United States Does Not Know Who It’s Killing

The United States Does Not Know Who It’s Killing

A remorseful acknowledgment of the drone deaths of American civilians is not an acceptable answer for a counterterrorism policy out of control.


https://foreignpolicy.com/2015/04/23/the-united-states-does-not-know-who-its-killing-drone-strike-deaths-pakistan/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Flashpoints&utm_campaign=BS%204%2F24%202014_FlashPoints%20[Manual]

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Has Yemen reshaped the Middle East geopolitical map? by Graham Fuller

Has Yemen reshaped the Middle East geopolitical map?

April 22, 2015 by Blog
Has Yemen reshaped the Middle East geopolitical map?
21 April 2015
Graham E. Fuller -grahamefuller.com
Does anybody remember the old Cold War geopolitical concept of the “Northern Tier states?” They consisted of three countries—Turkey, Iran and Pakistan (sometimes Afghanistan) that lay along the southern border of the Soviet Union; they were perceived in the West as a potential bulwark against Soviet aggression southwards into the Middle East. Is it just possible that we are witnessing today the possible recrudescence of a “Northern Tier” bloc? But this time it would not be united against Russia at all. On the contrary these three states demonstrate warming geopolitical congeniality with many aspects of Russian, Chinese, and “Eurasian” geopolitical views.
The ongoing crisis in Yemen may have become the midwife to such a development. If so, it is Iran that seems to be pulling the pieces together of a new loose power coalition in the Middle East.http://grahamefuller.com/has-yemen-reshaped-the-middle-east-geopolitical-map/

Secretary Of State For Hire: Hillary Clinton Made Millions From Foreign Donors In Exchange For "Favors"


Secretary Of State For Hire: Hillary Clinton Made Millions From Foreign Donors In Exchange For "Favors"

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-04-20/secretary-state-hire-hillary-clinton-made-millions-foreign-donors-exchange-favors

Another Reason To Move Away From California: "Conditions Are Like A Third-World Country"

Another Reason To Move Away From California: "Conditions Are Like A Third-World Country"



http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-04-20/another-reason-move-away-california-conditions-are-third-world-country

Noam Chomsky: Every Word in the Phrase ‘Free Trade Agreement’ Is False


Noam Chomsky: Every Word in the Phrase ‘Free Trade Agreement’ Is False


http://www.truthdig.com/avbooth/item/noam_chomsky_every_word_in_the_phrase_free_trade_agreement_false_20150422

Democratic Trade War: Obama Says Warren 'Wrong' on TPP as Reid Says 'Hell No' to Fast Track

Democratic Trade War: Obama Says Warren 'Wrong' on TPP as Reid Says 'Hell No' to Fast Track
by Jon Queally
In op-ed earlier this year, Warren condemned the TPP for its inclusion of a provision known as Investor-State Dispute Settlement, or ISDS, which would allow private corporations to sue governments if they believe laws or regulations are impeding their ability to make profits or adequately compete in a markets. http://www.commondreams.org/news/2015/04/22/democratic-trade-war-obama-says-warren-wrong-tpp-reid-says-hell-no-fast-track

As GOP Pushes Patriot Act Renewal, Critics Demand End to Mass Surveillance Provision

As GOP Pushes Patriot Act Renewal, Critics Demand End to Mass Surveillance Provision
by Nadia Prupis
Supporters of the provision say it is useful as a counter-terrorism measure. But as the Center for Democracy and Technology points out, "Section 215 is broadly worded, covering all business records of Americans—including medical records, firearm sales records, library and book sale records, credit card purchase information, Internet behavior data, and more." http://www.commondreams.org/news/2015/04/22/gop-pushes-patriot-act-renewal-critics-demand-end-mass-surveillance-provision

UK-U.S. Special Relationship Over?

UK-U.S. Special Relationship Over?

Posted by: Judy Dempsey
Wednesday, April 22, 2015 |
Every week, a selection of leading experts answer a new question from Judy Dempsey on the foreign and security policy challenges shaping Europe’s role in the world.

Fraser CameronDirector of the EU-Asia Center

The UK-U.S. relationship has been over for many years—at least since former U.S. president George H. W. Bush recognized Germany as the major U.S. ally in Europe in 1991. UK-U.S. relations reached their nadir over the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina in the mid-1990s, when a visiting UK defense minister could not raise a single U.S. congressman for a breakfast meeting on Capitol Hill.
The #UK-#US relationship has been over for many years. Tweet This
There was a brief revival in British-American ties under former UK prime minister Tony Blair, both with former U.S. president Bill Clinton and, strangely, with George W. Bush. But British public opinion was turned off by the Bush-Blair wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and now, the UK military is simply not in a position to support any such enterprise in the future.
In foreign policy, Washington is critical of the UK’s constant accommodation of China, its threats to leave the EU, and its gradual decline into irrelevance. This leaves intelligence cooperation, where again, the UK tries to hang on to U.S. coattails. But this is insufficient for any bilateral special relationship.
The sooner the UK wakes up to the fact that the United States prefers a united European voice on foreign policy, the better.http://carnegieeurope.eu/strategiceurope/?fa=59867&mkt_tok=3RkMMJWWfF9wsRonvKXNZKXonjHpfsX57uQsW6Sg38431UFwdcjKPmjr1YIGRcR0aPyQAgobGp5I5FEIQ7XYTLB2t60MWA%3D%3D

The grave danger of derailing the Iran deal — an interview with Chas Freeman -

The grave danger of derailing the Iran deal — an interview with Chas Freeman - See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/04/derailing-interview-freeman#sthash.HIfFqX0u.dpuf
The grave danger of derailing the Iran deal — an interview with Chas Freeman -
http://mondoweiss.net/2015/04/derailing-interview-freeman

Could Britain vote to quit the EU and the US?

William Pfaff

Paris, April 22, 2015— The British general election early next month may prove as significant for Europe, and even for the United States, as for Britain itself. The British electorate must make an unprecedented choice among Conservatives, Labour, Liberal Democrats, Scottish Nationalists, UK Independents (or UKIP, who want to quit Europe) and Greens, to name only the parties likely to have any influence on the outcome.

This dazzling array of political choice, to voters collectively accustomed for nearly a century only to Tories, Liberals, Labour and an unelectable left, offers a conundrum to those who would forecast the outcome this year. As of this writing, the Conservatives and Labour are so closely matched in voter opinion as to make virtually no difference. Either, winning by the minuscule margins suggested today, is almost certain to need a coalition partner to construct a government. The candidates for that role are the Liberal Democrats, who shared rule with the Conservatives in the present outgoing government, but who have always harbored leftist sympathies and would shock few if they joined a new government with Ed Miliband’s reformed Labour Party.
 The URL for this article is:
http://www.williampfaff.com/article.php?storyid=726

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

The Pentagon's $10-billion bet gone bad - Los Angeles Times

The Pentagon's $10-billion bet gone bad - Los Angeles Timeshttp://graphics.latimes.com/missile-defense/

China’s Middle East Tightrope | Foreign Policy

China’s Middle East Tightrope | Foreign Policyhttps://foreignpolicy.com/2015/04/20/china-middle-east-saudi-arabia-iran-oil-nuclear-deal/

How to Avert a Nuclear War

How to Avert a Nuclear War


http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/20/opinion/how-to-avert-a-nuclear-war.html?_r=0

China’s pivot to Eurasia

China’s pivot to Eurasia

The Obama administration has been talking about a pivot to Asia as a major policy shift, but not much has come of it, because our involvement in the Middle East is proving as sticky as ever. This is no surprise given the influence of the Israeli lobby. Meanwhile the Chinese, in terms of historic geopolitical trends, are eating our lunch.http://www.progressivehumanism.com/topical-issues/chinas-pivot-to-eurasia/

Rare earth mineral reserves were discovered in North Korea — and it could be a game-changer - Business Insider

Rare earth mineral reserves were discovered in North Korea — and it could be a game-changer - Business Insider

Why Bob Graham wants to publish secret records - Business Insider

Why Bob Graham wants to publish secret records - Business Insiderhttp://www.businessinsider.com/why-bob-graham-wants-to-publish-secret-records-2015-4?utm_source=alerts&nr_email_referer=1

Europe's Nightmare: Ukraine's Massive Meltdown

The National Interest



Europe's Nightmare: Ukraine's Massive Meltdown

Will the Iranian Solution Work for the North Korean Nuclear Problem?

Will the Iranian Solution Work for the North Korean Nuclear Problem?

Source: TASS/ZUMA
Posted by:


http://carnegie.ru/eurasiaoutlook/?fa=59849&mkt_tok=3RkMMJWWfF9wsRonva3NZKXonjHpfsX57uQsW6Sg38431UFwdcjKPmjr1YIERMV0aPyQAgobGp5I5FEIQ7XYTLB2t60MWA%3D%3D

Who Is Saudi Arabia Really Targeting In Its Price War?

Who Is Saudi Arabia Really Targeting In Its Price War?



http://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2015/04/saudi-arabia-really-targeting-price-war.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+NakedCapitalism+%28naked+capitalism%29

Monday, April 20, 2015

Russia and America: Stumbling to War


Russia and America: Stumbling to War


Could a U.S. response to Russia’s actions in Ukraine provoke a confrontation that leads to a U.S.-Russian war? 


http://nationalinterest.org/print/feature/russia-america-stumbling-war-12662

The West Snubs Russia over V-E Day

The West Snubs Russia over V-E Day

April 20, 2015 | https://consortiumnews.com/2015/04/20/the-west-snubs-russia-over-v-e-day/

Exclusive: Last year’s U.S.-backed coup in Ukraine – followed by violence and tensions – has soured plans for the May 9 commemoration in Moscow of World War II’s V-E Day, the Allied defeat of Nazi Germany, a war which cost the Russian people nearly 27 million dead, as ex-CIA analyst Ray McGovern describes.
By Ray McGovern

Obama Tries His Hand at ‘Realism’

Obama Tries His Hand at ‘Realism’

April 20, 2015 | https://consortiumnews.com/2015/04/20/obama-tries-his-hand-at-realism/

President Obama is what might be called a “closet realist” who often pounds his fists upon the table while shaking hands under the table. He has to pull off this trick because of America’s ugly partisan realities, says ex-CIA analyst Paul R. Pillar.
By Paul R. Pillar

Mohammad Javad Zarif: A Message From Iran

The New York Times | Op-Ed Contributor

Mohammad Javad Zarif: A Message From Iran

By MOHAMMAD JAVAD ZARIF
APRIL 20, 2015
TEHRAN — WE made important progress in Switzerland earlier this month. With the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council plus Germany, we agreed on parameters to remove any doubt about the exclusively peaceful nature of Iran’s nuclear program and to lift international sanctions against Iran.
But to seal the anticipated nuclear deal, more political will is required. The Iranian people have shown their resolve by choosing to engage with dignity. It is time for the United States and its Western allies to make the choice between cooperation and confrontation, between negotiations and grandstanding, and between agreement and coercion.
With courageous leadership and the audacity to make the right decisions, we can and should put this manufactured crisis to rest and move on to much more important work. The wider Persian Gulf region is in turmoil. It is not a question of governments rising and falling: the social, cultural and religious fabrics of entire countries are being torn to shreds.
Endowed with a resilient population that has stood firm in the face of coercion while simultaneously showing the magnanimity to open new horizons of constructive engagement based on mutual respect, Iran has weathered the storms of instability caused by this mayhem. But we cannot be indifferent to the unfathomable destruction around us, because chaos does not recognize borders.
Iran has been clear: The purview of our constructive engagement extends far beyond nuclear negotiations. Good relations with Iran’s neighbors are our top priority. Our rationale is that the nuclear issue has been a symptom, not a cause, of mistrust and conflict. Considering recent advances in symptom prevention, it is time for Iran and other stakeholders to begin to address the causes of tension in the wider Persian Gulf region.
Iranian foreign policy is holistic in nature. This is not due to habit or preference, but because globalization has rendered all alternatives obsolete. Nothing in international politics functions in a vacuum. Security cannot be pursued at the expense of the insecurity of others. No nation can achieve its interests without considering the interests of others.
Nowhere are these dynamics more evident than in the wider Persian Gulf region. We need a sober assessment of the complex and intertwined realities here, and consistent policies to deal with them. The fight against terror is a case in point.
One cannot confront Al Qaeda and its ideological siblings, such as the so-called Islamic State, which is neither Islamic nor a state, in Iraq, while effectively enabling their growth in Yemen and Syria.
There are multiple arenas where the interests of Iran and other major stakeholders intersect. The establishment of a collective forum for dialogue in the Persian Gulf region, to facilitate engagement, is long overdue.
If one were to begin serious discussion of the calamities the region faces, Yemen would be a good place to start. Iran has offered a reasonable and practical approach to address this painful and unnecessary crisis. Our plan calls for an immediate cease-fire, humanitarian assistance and facilitation of intra-Yemeni dialogue, leading to the formation of an inclusive, broad-based national unity government.
On a broader level, regional dialogue should be based on generally recognized principles and shared objectives, notably respect for sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of all states; inviolability of international boundaries; noninterference in internal affairs; peaceful settlement of disputes; impermissibility of threat or use of force; and promotion of peace, stability, progress and prosperity in the region.
A regional dialogue could help promote understanding and interaction at the levels of government, the private sector and civil society, and lead to agreement on a broad spectrum of issues, including confidence- and security-building measures; combating terrorism, extremism and sectarianism; ensuring freedom of navigation and the free flow of oil and other resources; and protection of the environment. A regional dialogue could eventually include more formal nonaggression and security cooperation arrangements.
While this cooperation must be kept to relevant regional stakeholders, existing institutional frameworks for dialogue, and especially the United Nations, must be utilized. The secretary general could furnish the necessary international umbrella. A regional role for the United Nations, already envisaged in the Security Council resolution that helped end the Iran-Iraq war in 1988, would help alleviate concerns and anxieties, particularly of smaller countries; provide the international community with assurances and mechanisms for safeguarding its legitimate interests; and link any regional dialogue with issues that inherently go beyond the boundaries of the region.
The world cannot afford to continue to avoid addressing the roots of the turmoil in the wider Persian Gulf region. This unique opportunity for engagement must not be squandered.
Mohammad Javad Zarif is the foreign minister of the Islamic Republic of Iran.بA version of this op-ed appears in print on April 20, 2015, on page A19 of the New York edition with the headline: A Message From Iran.

GE anticipates $90B from GE Capital assets sale - Oil & Gas Financial Journal

GE anticipates $90B from GE Capital assets sale - Oil & Gas Financial Journal
http://www.ogfj.com/articles/2015/04/ge-anticipates-90b-from-ge-capital-assets-sale.html?cmpid=EnlOGFJApril202015.html

Obama just hung John Kerry out to dry on the emerging Iran deal - Business Insider

Obama just hung John Kerry out to dry on the emerging Iran deal - Business Insider

Xi Jinping launches $46-bn investment plan in Pakistan - The Hindu

Xi Jinping launches $46-bn investment plan in Pakistan - The Hindu

http://www.thehindu.com/news/international/xi-launches-46bn-investment-plan-in-pakistan/article7123089.ece

Corridor of power Xi Jinping arrives, bearing gifts

China and Pakistan

All latest updates

Corridor of power

Xi Jinping arrives, bearing gifts


http://www.economist.com/news/asia/21648918-xi-jinping-arrives-bearing-gifts-corridor-power

War News Updates: The Cost Of The U.S. War Against The Islamic State Has Passed The $2 Billion Mark

War News Updates: The Cost Of The U.S. War Against The Islamic State Has Passed The $2 Billion Mark

War News Updates: America Cannot Afford The F-35

War News Updates: America Cannot Afford The F-35

War News Updates: The U.S. Does Not Have The Money To Replace It's ICBMs, Bombers, And Subs

War News Updates: The U.S. Does Not Have The Money To Replace It's ICBMs, Bombers, And Subs

War News Updates: The U.S. Government Has Abandoned Americans In Yemen

War News Updates: The U.S. Government Has Abandoned Americans In Yemen

Who Needs the Clinton Foundation? - WSJ

Who Needs the Clinton Foundation? - WSJ

‘There Are Still Judges…’ by Uri Avnery

‘There Are Still Judges…’
by
http://original.antiwar.com/avnery/2015/04/19/there-are-still-judges/

Our Enemies, the Saudis They’re invading Yemen to empower Al Qaeda

Our Enemies, the Saudis
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Dangerous Gamesmanship By Steve Coll

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By



http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/04/27/dangerous-gamesmanship?mbid=nl_042015_Daily&CNDID=20985530&mbid=nl_042015_Daily&CNDID=20985530&spMailingID=7677341&spUserID=Nzk3OTExODQwMDIS1&spJobID=661914346&spReportId=NjYxOTE0MzQ2S0

Congress' Charade With the Iran Nuclear Agreement

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ivan-eland/congresss-charade-with-th_b_7099944.html

Senior Fellow and Director of the Center on Peace & Liberty, The Independent Institute

Congress' Charade With the Iran Nuclear Agreement

Posted: 04/20/2015
Apparently, Dick Cheney is not the only one who thinks the president has ceded too much of his power since the 1970s and has become too week vis-à-vis the other two branches of American government. Now, on the other end of the political spectrum, Steven Rattner, a Wall Street executive and former Obama Treasury Department official who helped engineer the president's bailout of huge, irresponsibly managed American auto companies, has echoed Cheney in a recent New York Times opinion piece: "The assault on presidential authority dates from at least the early 1970s, when a mix of the Vietnam War, Watergate and a mushrooming executive branch raised fears of an "Imperial Presidency'...." Since some on the left and some on the right agree with this premise, it must be true, right? Wrong. Compared with the Europeans, Americans are not good at remembering their history, and Cheney and Rattner, though better than most, only remember back to the 1970s, and even then, their memory is cloudy.